About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 31
CSPAN 17
CNNW 9
SFGTV2 9
CNN 7
COM 6
FBC 6
MSNBCW 6
KQED (PBS) 4
LINKTV 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 137
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 143 (some duplicates have been removed)
the battlefield. at that point, the nazis controlled the mediterranean's, so to get to north africa which is where the british and the axis at that point fighting with each other we've to go all the way around the bottom of africa which was 13,000 miles. it's crazy to think of it but that's the only way we could do it they had to make is amazingly long journey. they stopped in k-town and michael learned a brief in k-town and then they reached the suez canal on the timber third, 1942. now i should probably get a little background on the war in north africa. historians when they talk about it the metaphors like a seesaw. a sort of war in the fall of 1940 the and journeys of grandeur to write in the streets of cairo to make a plea for cairo. they drove the i talions pretty far west into libya to bailout mazzoleni although they were not happy about that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 19
for the battlefield. at that point, the nazis controlled the mediterranean. so to get to north africa, which is where the british were at that point fighting each other, they had to go all the way around the bottom of 13,000 miles and it's crazy to think of it. almost everything but went to the battlefield -- they had to make this amazingly long journey that took a month. maybe more like six weeks. my uncle, i learned, had his own very passionate love affair while in cape town and they reached u.s. and egypt on september 3, 1942. i should probably give a little background on the war in africa. when historians talk about it can use metaphors like pendulum, it was this peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940. mussolini had visions of grandeur, he wanted to ride his streets down the roads of cairo and he decided to attack the british doing it. the british attacked back and drove the italians pretty far west into libya, at which point hitler realized that he really needed to bail out, although don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in or when ronald, along with a bunch of oth
, the nazis controlled mediterranean, so to get to north africa, which is where the british and the access were at that point, fighting with each other, you had to go all way around the bottom of africa. it was 13,000 miles. it's crazy to think of it. it's the only way they could do it. almost everything that went to the battle needle north africa had to make an amazingly long journey with a stop in cape town. it took a month. six -- maybe more like six weeks. they stopped in cape town, my uncle, i learned had his own passionate love affair in cape town, and then they reached suez in egypt on september 3rd, 1942. now i should probably give a little bit of background on the war in north africa. historian when they talk about it tend use metaphor like seesaw, pendulum, it was a peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940, moose lee knee had vision of grand door. he wanted to ride the white stallion down the street of cairo. he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east, the british attacked right back, and drove the italians pretty far west in to libya,
for the battlefield. at that point the nazis controlled the mediterranean. so to get to north africa which is where the british and the axis were at that point fighting with each other, you had to go all the way around the bottom of africa. it was 13,000 miles. it's crazy to think of it, but that's the only way they could do it. almost everything that went to the battlefield in north africa had to make this amazingly long journey with a stop in the capetown. it took a month, six weeks -- maybe more like six weeks. they stopped in capetown. my uncle, i learned, had his own very passionate love affair, although brief, in capetown. and then they reached suez in egypt on september 3rd, 1942. now, i should probably give a little background on the war in north africa. historians when they talk about it tend to use metaphors like seesaw, pendulum. it was this peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940. mussolini had visions of grandeur, i guess, wanted to ride his white stallion down the streets of cairo. he had trooped in libya when was an italian colony, and he decided to make a play
fighting from north africa. and a big part of the reason was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet, many battleships. it was the fourth largest navy in the world. and churchill was very worried that if france was conquered, then hitler would seize the french fleet. and the arithmetic was, if you put the german fleet, which was considerable, they had the bismarck coming along, together with italian fleet which was an ally of the germans and at a considerable in the mediterranean, if you can put that together with the french fleet which was the fourth largest fleet in the world, now you have a navy that was larger than the british fleet. and if that happened, it's game, set and match for britain. they could have controlled the sea lanes for the island. it was going to be over. so churchill implored them to keep fighting because he was worried about the french battleships. in disarray, very overwhelmingly conquered. and a certain element in france decided it was better to try to come to an agreement with the germans about how they could then drop out of the war. and an interesti
, including through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones using a small footprint approach that includes precision operations, partnered activities with foreign, special forces operations and capacity- building so that partner countries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own. wherever possible, we will work through and with local partners supporting them with the intelligence and resources they need in order to deter these common threats. for example, in mali, we are working with our partners, in western africa, who are committed to encountering the regional threat through regional statistic built. fourth, in support of these kinds of efforts, we have to invest in the future. in new military and intelligence capabilities and security partnerships. our new defense strategy makes clear that the military must retain and even build new counterterrorism capabilities for the future. as we reduce the size of the military, we are going to continu
and north and west africa including al qaeda in the islamic nigreb and nigeria. the international community and regional partners share concern about mali where al qaeda affiliated groups have taken control of territories in the and pose an emerging threat. we are also concerned about libya where violent extremists and affiliates of al qaeda attacked and killed innocent americans in benghazi. respect to that attack, let me be clear, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice those who perpetrated those attacks. to protect americans at home and overseas, we need continue to pursue al qaeda wherever they, go whatever form they take and wherever they seek to hide. we must be constantly vigilant, we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy but what will it take to achieve the end of al qaeda or at least the beginning of the end. first, it will be essential to finish the job that we started and that we must complete in afghanistan, and we are on track to do that. we and our nato partners agreed at lisbon, afghans need to be for their own security by the end of 2014. th
. >> now, a discussion on the state of security forces and arab states in north africa, including libya, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what
. >> the desert tech project would see solar energy produced in north africa and exported to europe. according to a german newspaper, a treaty could be signed by early next year. the first solar farm would be built in morocco. >> could the saharan son soon be powering european cities -- the saharan sun? it could be home to a large new solar farm with the capacity of 150 megawatts. that is just one part of europe's vision to get renewable energy from africa. german-led consortium does it take wants to provide 50% of europe's energy by 2015, using wind and solar energy -- german- led consortium desert-tech. it is hoped that current negotiations could provide a breakthrough, paving the way for plants not only in morocco, but also tunisia, algeria, and other countries. the biggest question is funding. companies would take on around 200 million euros of the investment. another 400 million could come from national governments involved as well as eu funds. >> certainly an ambitious but impressive project. that is it for now. thanks for watching. >> do not forget, you can find more on our website at d
specializes in north africa. what's your opinion about all of this? what are the chances of an international intervention? >> there is by now broad international and regional support for an intervention that would involve some form of african combat mission, including in northern mali. it looks likely it will happen within the next few months. what it will look like is unclear at the moment because some very important questions are yet to be answered, such as which countries will send troops and who will actually finance the operation. it looks most likely that it will be the european union. >> do you see any possibility of a negotiated solution to this dispute? can you even get the no. factions to the table right now? >> and exclusively negotiated solution, i do not think so. that's unrealistic, but in fact, behind the armed groups in the north, there is much more than just a small branch of extremists. there are influential local businessmen, tribal leaders who have joined these groups for tactical reasons, so that is what makes the conflict so complicated, and that is what makes an africa
world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have been able to treat some of your war wounded at u.s. hospitals. we look forward to building partnerships between american and libyan hospitals to help return libya's healthcare system to the extraordinary standards of excellence it once enjoyed. over my shoulder here you can see the u.s. capitol building. in that building 535 electe
it was happening. he's said to be connected to extremist groups in north africa. he now remains in custody of his home country of tunisia. >>> the new york nanny accused of brutally killing the two children she had been carrying for has been charged with first- and second-degree murder. she stabbed the two with a kitchen knife at the family's upper west side apartment. she then tried to kill herself. the mother walked in on the gruesome scene and called the police. the nanny is recovering in a new york hospital from her self-in flikted wounds. >>> president obama picked up a key endorsement just two days before election day. [ male announcer ] what can you experience in a seat? inspiration. great power. iconic design. exhilarating performance. [ race announcer ] audi once again has created le mans history! [ male announcer ] and once in a great while... all of the above. take your seat in the incomparable audi a8. take advantage of exceptional values on the audi a8 during the season of audi event. ♪ i got your campbell's chunky soup. mom? who's mom? i'm the giants mascot. the giants don't have
's electricity from solar and wind parks in north africa and the middle east by 2050. the company says it will not renew its involvement at the end of the year. >> in germany, hearings have begun in the country's first case of a woman suing for compensation over faulty breast implants. >> the case is being closely watched because it could set a precedent for future claims. 5000 german women are known to have received implants from dubious manufacturers. >> she's exhausted after a four- hour hearing, but she still in the fight. >> people warned me not to file a complaint. should say -- this that i was crazy -- they said i was crazy. >> the mother of three has suffered chest pain and numbness since she received breast plants like these in 2007. she blames the french manufacturer for fitting them with sheep, industrial grades silicone. the boss is still awaiting trial, but the company itself has gone bankrupt, so she is also suing the german supplier of silicone and the german+ testing institute of the implants. she also is pointing a finger at her surgeon, who she says told turn the -- s
, with temperatures in the summer rising almost 11 degrees here in the u.s., as well as the mediterranean, north africa and the middle east. now, all of this gives new urgency to the annual climate change conference opening today, looking at the goal of the global agreement to reduce greenhouse gases. >> there are already new coastlines here in the east. anne thompson, thank you for your reporting here tonight. >>> still, as we continue, what if it was your job to deliver on all the on-line orders placed today? after seeing tonight's story you may never look at your ups delivery person the same way ever again. >>> and later, did we just hear the first real hint of impatience from prince charles? the surprising comments from the man next in line to the throne. d>>> all this internet commerce we have been talking about tonight's all the people buying things on amazon, all of those purchases need to be delivered, of course to people where they live. that takes a lot of people, and those people need to know what they're doing. the biggest name in the business, ups, has a new way to train its army of
and north africa, infection rates are going up since public discussion of the issue is virtually nonexistent. high risk groups such as drug addicts are ostracized. aids remains a political issue. as long as governments around the world deny the disease and its causes, it will continue to spread. >> kenya is among the countries in africa that have experienced a dramatic fall in the number of deaths resulting from hiv/aids. >> a decade ago, the prevalence rate was close of 15%. it is now at about 6.5%, but that is still high by international standards, and that is not only what prevention wants to change, but treatment is also extremely important. >> here is one german company that is making a difference not only in kenya but all over africa. >> rowland has been to kenya many times, but this is his first visit to the slum in nairobi. around 90,000 people live here. medicine is scarce, and there are only 20 basic doctor surgery to treat those with hiv. is the head of the biotech company that does business with medical centers like this one. he knows how urgently the center needs support. the ch
attention for this insightful and hopefully thought-provoking and on arab north africa. the current of change that so sweeping to the middle east had its humble beginnings and the subregion that this panel will address, arab north africa. the expenses of countries on the southern shores of the mediterranean, offer competing visions of the course that change may take in the broader region. in tunisia, we find an elected coalition government face with security challenge. and debate over fundamental constitutional principles while economic struggles that help motivate original call for change continue. in libya, trident and tragedy have marked a transition that is success of produce libya's first elected government in nearly 50 years. but yet libya remains haunted by the ghost of the gadhafi era, it's divisive legacy and its new government has a long way to go to build its own capacities and a certain national leadership. egyptians have taken the first step beyond the political view that characterized their transition period. but president morsi and their allies find and subscribe with
africa. along the north coast of chile and the coast of southwest africa are deserts which extend all the way to the sea, and these deserts are quite unusual because they owe their existence to cold offshore marine currents. now, in many coastal latitudes, the air coming off the ocean is full of moisture which is evaporated from the sea, given ordinary sea surface temperatures. but these cold marine currents chill the overlying air and so reduce its capacity for holding moisture. the air that blows inland, as a result, is very dry, and the result of that are these coastal deserts. so there are several ways by which deserts can come into being-- subtropical descent of equatorial air currents... rain shadow effects... great distance of land mass from the sea... cold coastal currents in warm latitudes... and in polar regions, the inability of cold air masses to hold much moisture. most of these extreme desert environments contain many unique land forms which, despite the infrequency of rainfall, are often shaped by running water. this seeming paradox can be explained by the fact that des
intensive than either america or europe, imported oil coming from the middle east and north africa. they had to evacuate 30,000 chinese during that time from libya. i would question the need for china to stabilize its sources of oil and is to reserves from that point of the oregon the lead to the same kind of ambition and a geopolitical force as we have over the last 60, 70 years? is that one of the to the kind of conflict we're talking about? >> yes, sir. >> canada. at a quick comment i take issue with whether or not it is the vision know what is there are not there. canada and u.s. have an interesting -- >> [indiscernible] >> i think we were a lot better off when it was -- anyway, that is in a side. i want to ask mj the question as to moving from the flash point at the moment, the longer-term issue of the indian ocean and sing china bases in sri lanka and elsewhere. does any regard this as a legitimate protection by china of its sea lanes for commerce with africa where it has significant oil, or does it see ed an instrument -- see it as a threat to india as opposed to a legitimate protecti
. they've taken over a country. mali, in north africa. they're all over libya. so it may interfere with that narrative. but, again, there's one other aspect we've covered in other times. they said they wanted to not give classified assessment of what happened because they didn't want to betray sources. well, if a classified assessment changed the classified assessment why would you keep that from the american people? >> schieffer: in other words, you're saying the unclassified version told one story, and the classified information told another story. it's not they were just withholding details. you're saying they gave two different stories. >> it certainly-- certainly-- without the mention-- the unclassified without the mention-- the mention of al qaeda. and we all know now that al qaeda-affillated groups were behind this and that it was not a spontaneous demonstration. so we really need to get through this. we need to work together for the sake of these families. but to tell the american people even on the 25th of september when it was well known, before the united nations, that a
or captured but over the last decade al-qaeda has generated franchises in places like north africa who's member were involved in on attack on the american embassy in benghazi and sending fighters into syria, and in yemen those that were responsible for the so-called underpanteds bomber. so these different franchises while maybe not having think ability to carry out mass attacks like the 9/11 attack still can cause great violence. >> jennifer: really appreciate you coming in. thank you so much eric schmidt. >> thank you. >> jennifer: appreciate it. up next the saying it all depends on your point of view is especially relevant when discussing drones. there is a human dynamic that goes well beyond the strategy and statistics and we'll tell you about that right after the break. (vo)answer: pour disaronno into a flute glass and top with prosecco. brought to you by disaronno. be originale. unwrap your paradise. soft, sweet coconut covered in rich, creamy chocolate. almond joy and mounds. unwrap paradise. >> most of the media coverage and the u.s. government mind in the u
be quite different. >> i think that the muslim brotherhood government in north africa had a different plan. they want to take the time to support strategically and are still struggling and the inside. so is the case with turkey cannot answer your question. he is not ready right now to confront anything that has to do with the arab-israeli conflict. his public position has to align with hamas and egypt. the real confrontation is between iran and israel. lou: the real confrontation may be, but the real money is comin@ from the united states and the u.s.-led international monetary fund. billion and a half dollars of president obama has asked for. almost $5 billion. guarantees. this is wherever else it is. radical islamic state, the muslim brotherhood led egyptian government. it is strangling in an economy that is simply not working. the united states and europe have the trump cards in this. is that an incorrect statement in your judgment? >> yes, because the imf still has already been signed. he has that credit line out there. i think what's going on in egypt is that there is a struggle betwe
as a place to interrogate other prisoners from north africa and the middle east. the cia denies this thing the cia has not had detention authority since january 2009 when president obama signed executive order 13491, the cia claims any suggestions that they are uninformed and baseless, but a super source confirms the libyan militia men being held at the cia in benghazi may have been a possible motive for the staged attack on the consulate which we now know the diplomatic facility in name only. cheryl: not a video. so many videos. thank you very much. appreciate it. dennis: questions about the only time in handling, matt welch, editor in chief of "reason" magazine joining us now. what do you think is a simple most important question arising out of the latest scandal? >> i want to know why david petraeus told members of congress around the same time broadwell is giving a speech in colorado that he thought it was a spontaneous demonstration against a video. they're pretty credible reporting from fox and other news outlets and other people that this didn't look a spontaneous, it looks bland, 1
north africa, the middle east, they're going to shoot down airliners. they were doing the right job. the problem is as i said, it's libya. a very unstable flaplace. everything i'd seen, the local forces there, some of them turns against the consulate and that's the worst nightmare. >> this arrangement, would use the state department as cover, when we try to ascertain who is responsible for this falling through the cracks, who is it then in this case? from your reporting? >> well, i mean, we're eight weeks, nearly eight weeks after this september 11th attack and we remain, we get different stories from different agencies. the state department believed that it had a binding agreement with the cia that the team there, their muscle, would be the cavalry and that it would come when called. that was part of the rationale for keeping security at the level it was at in benghazi, but when you talk to officials close to the cia and congressional investigators, they say the cia thought it was more an informal arrangement and it wasn't their responsibility and they did not have staffing levels
the middle east, north africa, brought the world, being attacked. it is why the sequestration deal is not only wrong but it is dangerous. we have to find who was involved in libya. my view is any country that does not protect our embassies ought not get a tennis -- a penny of american taxpayer dollars. $450 billion going to egypt and the muslim brotherhood. i do not think that money ought to be sent because they proved they will be working with us against terrorism, by their trading with our good friend in the middle east, israel, and we need to be unified with israel, shoulder to shoulder with israel, preventing iran from getting nuclear weapon capability. one of the big missed opportunities of this president being quiet when they had the spring uprising and the resolution -- the revolution in iran. i remember ronald reagan said -- he called the soviet union the evil empire. we should have at least said those in iran who wanted a free and just society. the president kept quiet. i do agree with tim kaine on the issue of virginia tech. everyone should be commended by that response a
spain, france, asia minor, north africa and egypt. transportation expert ross hassig. it was closer is terms of the cost of transportation to get to egypt than it was to get a hundred miles inland in italy. you couldn't bring food from a hundred miles inland to rome, because even with carts, even with oxen, it simply cost too much. so rome was able to tap into the production of other areas because it was able to use ships where the cost of transportation was extremely low. keach: but roman seagoing merchant ships carrying upwards of a thousand tons were too large to navigate the tiber river, so cargos were unloaded onto smaller vessels downriver at the port city of ostia. ostia was once a bustling commercial city, with shops and restaurants... villas and apartment houses for merchants and shippers... theaters, parks and enormous warehouses crammed with every possible commodity. archaeologist amanda claridge. it's clear that the merchants, the many, many thousands of people involved in the supply of the city of rome who did base themselves in ostia -- all the transient ships' captain
of the landing on north africa. imagine an american president praising the great jihad of american freedom. we don't remember that because of words matter so much less than actions. all right, if those are three broad lessons, what are the three most urgent issues of your agenda? i will not repeat the words of my colleagues because i ran nuclear negotiations are number one and bringing down assad as quickly as possible is number two but the third is the following -- preventing the collapse of one or more additional pro-western regimes especially pro-western monarchies. three are at the top of the list -- bahrain, jordan, and morocco. morocco has figured out a recipe for its survival bahrain has big brother saudi arabia looking out for it. jordan, however, is the most vulnerable and the one whose loss would undermine u.s. interests in multiple and immediate ways. for the life of me, i have not heard a good explanation as to why the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to jordan. as a corollary, i can understand why the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to egypt. t
in the week before his resignation under pressure he had gone to north africa, gone to egypt and also gone to libya, talked to some of the people involved in this and i think he wanted ground truth, he wanted to thank the people who acted courageously. that's one thing that sometimes gets left out of the story. i'm sure they asked him about what he found, what requests he asked, what answers he got. i'm sure there are other details that go into this that, again, were part of the classified record but i have not been able to learn them. >> rose: where does the investigation of the c.i.a. into general petraeus stand? >> it's continuing investigation by the c.i.a. inspector general. it focuses on the question of c.i.a. resources. the security team watching general petraeus 24/7, he's a high-value target for al qaeda, the people who were carrying him around in vehicles and the question is where c.i.a. resources-- either people or vehicles or hotel rooms or whatever-- misused in an effort to conduct this contact with paula broadwell or conceal it? they're looking at that and that seems like an
the extraordinary challenges we face in north africa and the middle east. and that flight from reality is at the heart of the current gop. >> when president obama took office in 2009, the republicans were up against a president who was popular coming off a historical election. nobody went after him except dick cheney. >> absolutely. >> he was saying we're not on a war footing. he doesn't understand security. it seems like john mccain is taking on this role now. find anything you can and throw it at the wall. >> throw it at the president. the republicans have -- they don't have a lot of maneuvering room to be honest. because the president though he ended the war in iraq and is winding down the war in afghanistan, the president has, for a lot of progressives, been -- you know, has backed away from national policy. it's ones that mccain should like in many ways. if you want a select committee to investigate our national security, do it on a number of frameworks, but not susan rice and what she said on "meet the press." if you look at her interview, it was very cautious. she was given talk
ought to be filibuster. she misled the american people. she said she was an expert on north africa. either she knew what she was saying was wrong and knew al-qaeda was not designated because of a -- decimated because of a video or she took talking points and read them without investigating. >> chris: you're shaking your head. go ahead juan. >> that's so unfair. this lady was given intelligence material by the intelligence community. you can blame the intelligence community. there's no way you can blame susan rice and to suggest she's inqualified. she's a rhodes scholar. the ghazi thing is so politicized. time to end it. >> it's time to end this segment. >>> when we come back, the president and congressional leaders get back to work monday. will they come up with a way to avoid the fiscal cliff? finishes [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned something along the way. this is the age of knowing what you're made of. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask if your heart is healthy enough fo
the election with a tragedy that happened in north africa? >> and they were fighting him there and then geraldo tweeted on october 31st, gop bloodlust regarding benghazigate insincere deperate and reminiscent of fast and furious petraeus lie-new rule if issa in charge truth not the goal. >> thank god that geraldo has come to the point where he is willing to speak truth to power because they have the power of his paycheck. let's be honest about it. and that -- thomas ricks. we need more thomas ricks. if you listen closely to that interview with thomas ricks, once he said what he said, they cut that interview to 90 seconds and then you could hear the anchor shuffling papers. >> because the interview was cut prematurely. >> joe madison, ryan grim, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >>> coming up, donald trump is everything that's wrong with politics. now his own kids know it. what is an insider saying about the trump family intervention? >>> and mitch mcconnell is his goal to make president obama a one-term president fail. so he's ready to change, right? think again. stay with us. [ ma
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 143 (some duplicates have been removed)